An Unwanted Advance

A piece of Flash Fiction by Catherine Kos

An Unwanted Advance

Jerry’s boss told him she wanted to talk to him in her office. Her office is located at the end of the hall. No one wanted to go into the office, well, because Jerry and his co-workers were convinced there was a door in that office that led to Hell. Considering she seemed like Satan’s mistress, it wasn’t a hard thing to believe.

As Jerry enters, he glances around the room before taking a seat.

“You wanted to see me?” He asks.

“Yes, Jerry. I did.”

His boss was a scary old lady who reminded him of his mother. All business like and calm until you piss her off. He had to always walk around on his tiptoes around her.

He sat quietly, his hands shoved into his pockets, his eyes glued to his feet. He felt like a ten year old who just got sent to the principals office. He could feel her eyes just piercing his soul.

“Jerry, as you may have already guessed, I want to talk to you about the Christmas party.”

“I know, Ma’am. I want to say that I am sincerely sorry.”

“Why are you apologizing? I had a great time getting to know you,” She replied. “Have you told your wife about us yet?”

“…Talked to my wife… about us, Ma’am…?”

His boss grins in a way that reminds him of the cheshire cat.

“Oh, don’t play coy, Jerry. You know what I’m talking about.”

Her voice made his skin crawl, and not in a good way.

“I can assure you that I don’t know what you are talking about,” Jerry explains.

“Oh, you’re so cute, Jerry. I can understand why you would be shy, but I assure you, there is no reason to be.” She stands up from behind her desk, and approaches Jerry seductively.

“Um, Ma’am, please. I wasn’t at the Christmas party. My wife was sick, remember? I honestly have no idea what you’re talking about.”

His boss rubs her eyes, looks up at him closely then stands straight up.

“Right. It wasn’t you, it was Josh. My apologies.”

She straightens her business jacket, and walks back around her desk.

“You may leave now,” She says.

Jerry jumps up and practically runs out.

The end.

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